Meeting Archive:
As Preemies Grow: From Preterm Birth to Preschool & Beyond

Please find the link to the webinar on the column to the right, under the "Recordings" header.

Read Dr. Adam Wolfberg's blog on preventing preterm delivery, which inclues more information about cervical length measurement and progesterone treatment plus resources shared by Dr. Kelly Lowery on Learning Issues and ADHD.
 
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Visit KeepEmCookin (an online resource and community focussed on preventing preterm birth and supporting women on bedrest) and PeekabooICU (an online education and support community for families with babies in NICU or NICU graduates).
 
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Meeting Description:

Can't attend live? Register anyway, you'll receive a link to view the recorded webinar later at your convenience. Free Webinar, Open to all.

As Preemies Grow: From Preterm to Preschool & Beyond

In the United States, at least 1 in 8 babies are born prematurely (before the 37th week of gestation) and the numbers of preterm births continue to rise. This webinar features three expert clinical perspectives on prematurity, from preventing or managing preterm birth, to recognizing and overcoming neurologic implications as premature babies move into early childhood.

 

Dr. Adam Wolfberg: OB/GYN and Maternal Fetal Medicine specialist will talk about prenatal care, risk factors for preterm birth, considerations for future pregnancies, new research in cervical length monitoring, and therapies to prevent preterm delivery. He’ll also share personal perspectives of parenting a premature child from NICU to childhood.

Dr. Jason Carmel, Pediatric Neurologist, shares information about the premature baby’s brain development, current understanding of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and subtle neurodevelopmental implications of premature delivery, even at late-preterm gestational ages. Promising new research about how the brain may adapt to recovery and the developmental benefits of different types of sensory and motor therapy will be shared.

Dr. Kelly Lowery, Pediatric Neuropsychologist discusses the premature child in early school years as relating to learning, language and other areas of development.  She’ll discuss subtle signs of learning issues that are most common among former preterm infants without IVH, how to evaluate and when to seek help. She will also offer some reflections on her personal experience of delivering prematurely and raising a child who was a preterm infant.

Time will be allocated to question and answer at the end of the event. Please submit questions via this registration form prior to the event.

Details
Date: Wed, Nov 7, 2012
Time: 08:00 PM EST
Duration: 1 hour
Host(s): Isis Parenting
 Presenter Information
Dr. Adam Wolfberg
Speaker Photo

Dr. Adam Wolfberg Associate, Boston Maternal-Fetal Medicine.  Dr. Wolfberg specializes in prenatal diagnosis and prevention of preterm delivery. His first book, Fragile Beginnings, was published in February 2012. He has written on health-related topics for many publications including Slate.com, Newsweek, the Boston Globe Magazine, the Huffington Post and others.

Dr. Jason Carmel
Speaker Photo

Jason B. Carmel, M.D., Ph.D. Dir., Motor Recovery Lab; Dir., Early Brain Injury Recovery Clinic Burke Medical Research Institute in White Plains, NY; Asst. Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Carmel’s work is focused on the recovery of motor function after injury to the central nervous system using activity-based therapies. 


Dr. Kelly Lowery
Speaker Photo

 

Kelly Lowery, PsyD Pediatric neuropsychologist in Newton, MA. Dr. Lowery specializes in the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with learning, attention, and developmental disorders with particular expertise in managing complicated medical histories.