Meeting Archive:
PEHSU Grand Rounds Series: Understanding the Role of Phthalates and Phenols in Fertility, Pregnancy, and Child Health: From Research to Prevention


Meeting Description:

This presentation will discuss endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and describe common sources and routes of exposure, as well as the importance of critical windows of vulnerability and timing of exposure. Phthalates and phenols are the two large chemical classes of EDCs with widespread population exposure and have been covered broadly in the toxicological and epidemiological literature. By describing a large, preconception cohort study, this presentation will show how phthalates and phenols in the preconception and prenatal periods of vulnerability may impact fertility, pregnancy and child health. This webinar will also address primary prevention strategies and how simple measures can help reduce exposure.

Details
Date: Wed, Mar 21, 2018
Time: 01:00 PM EDT
Duration: 1 hour
Host(s): PEHSU National Program Office
 Presenter Information
Carmen Messerlian
Speaker Photo

Carmen Messerlian, PhD, MSc, is a Research Scientist at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health in Boston. She completed a PhD in Epidemiology from McGill University, and a MSc in Public Health from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Her current research focuses on understanding the extent to which preconception and prenatal exposures to environmental chemicals affect a couple’s ability to conceive, maintain pregnancy, and have healthy babies. As an environmental-reproductive-perinatal and pediatric epidemiologist, Dr Messerlian applies cutting-edge methods to generate evidence-based knowledge on the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproductive and child health. She explores the effects of phthalates, phenols, and other emerging chemicals on ovarian reserve, pregnancy loss, birth weight, placental parameters, preterm birth, and child neurodevelopment outcomes. Her goal is to use this evidence to inform clinical practice and improve public health.